An interesting comparison of technology adoption to Kubler-Ross’ five stages of grief:

Confusion. We don’t quite get it. We sign up for the new app, or buy one of the new devices after we see our cool friends using it. We give it a whirl, and quickly complain that things were easier the old way. By this time, gurus are reassuring us that it is the greatest thing ever. But that doesn’t help. We decide to wait another year for the next version.

Repudiation. There are many people who don’t get the new technology, and now social life is a little like a competition to show that we’re not “falling for it.” At this point, there can more social capital in saying that we don’t like the technology than that we do. We now hear snappy one-liners like, “Twitter. What could I possibly say in 140 characters?”

Shaming. This is when we are so persuaded that we’re right and the new innovation is wrong that we are prepared to make fun of the credulous among us. “This Twitter thing. It’s just a fad. Give it a couple of months and it will go away.” We heard a lot of this sort of thing about Pinterest in the early days. Now it’s valued at $2.5 billion.

Acceptance. By this time, the innovation is taking off. The middle adopters are signing on. It is clear now even to late adopters (the great majority) that there is at least one useful aspect of the new technology, and it’s here to stay. Confronted by accomplished, irrefutable fact, the rest of us cave in, sign up, and brag about how modern we are.

Forgetting. This is where we destroy the evidence, even in our own mind. Now we are inclined to act as if we always understood and approved of a world instilled with new innovation. One minute, we are too smart to be fooled by Twitter. The next we are fully on board. It’s a like high school. We are captives of what Mark Earls calls “the herd.”

Thanks to  Startups Should be Wary of Disruptive Technologies – Forbes.